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Know! To Create A Summer Bucket List
For many students, summer break has officially begun. That means a break from having to drag tired children out of bed and a break from all the homework. But most of all, it means a chance for our young people to enjoy a little more fun and relaxation. 

For a kid, summer seems to go on forever. As an adult, however, we know how quickly it can fly by. While spontaneity can be exciting and fun, a little preplanning can go a long way in helping our tweens and teens make the most of the summer months.

Research proves time and again that there is power in writing down your goals and refer to them often. So, gather your children, their ideas and get your must-do summer fun ideas on paper.

Read More
Know! May Is Mental Health Awareness Month
In celebration of Mental Health Awareness Month, Mental Health America (MHA) is sharing practical tools that everyone can use to improve their mental health and increase their resiliency.

While one in five people will experience a mental illness during their lifetime, everyone faces challenges in life that can impact their mental health. In fact, among the people who took an anxiety screening at mhascreening.org in 2020, 64% felt afraid, as if something awful might happen at least half of the time or nearly every day. Another 50% of people who took MHA’s depression screening in 2020 reported feeling that they were a failure or had let their families down nearly every day.

Read More
Know! How To Combat Spring Fever

Spring has sprung and the changes are plentiful; the trees are awakening, flowers are blooming, the sun is shining longer and warmer. You may notice changes in your children as well this time of year. They may have increased energy, impulsiveness and restlessness. Teachers may catch them daydreaming more in school and fidgeting during class. While doctors do not consider this an official medical or psychological condition, this real phenomenon has a name—it’s called SPRING FEVER.

There is an abundance of research on how seasonal changes impact children’s moods and behaviors. The problem with spring fever is, when restlessness and impulsiveness rise, trouble tends to follow. It is common for young people to experience attitude changes and display acting-out behaviors, and unfortunately, teachers seem to get the brunt of it. Additionally, schools see a drop in attendance this time of year, as well as their students’ ability to focus and stay on task.

So how can we help children finish out the school year strong, while keeping the attitudes and behaviors in check?

Read More
Know! To Keep It Safe This Party Season
Prom and graduation seasons are quickly approaching. Though COVID-19 lingers on, many school districts around the country are working on plans to allow for both events to safely take place this year. While these celebrations will most likely look and feel different from prepandemic times, there are certain aspects that are likely to continue on—we’re talking about underage drinking.

As a parent, it may be tempting to think to ourselves that if our older teens are going to experiment with a substance, we’d prefer it to be alcohol over other drugs. However, when we consider the range of risks and negative consequences alcohol presents, we know we cannot afford to allow for underage drinking.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) shares the following dangers associated with teens consuming alcohol:

Read More
Know! To Talk Teen Romance
It’s spring, and love is in the air, regardless of there being a pandemic taking place. In fact, while COVID may be creating additional complexities for romance, young love is still blooming. Though some parents cringe at the thought of talking to their child about romantic relationships, it’s a must-have discussion. As we think about the ongoing “talks” we will have with our sons and daughters, it’s important to know that we would be amiss if those conversations focused solely on sex education, abstinence, how to prevent pregnancy and how to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. While these are all necessary and vital topics, there is another monumental part of the teen romance talk that needs to be addressed, that is, what it means to have a healthy romantic relationship and how to recognize when it’s not.

According to LoveIsRespect.org, all relationships fall somewhere on The Relationship Spectrum from healthy to abusive, with unhealthy being somewhere in the middle.
Healthy relationships involve:

Respect.
Good communication.
Trust.
Honesty.
Equality.

Read More
Know! Online Predators On The Rise
It is no surprise that young people are racking up more time on their electronic devices for both work and play due to the pandemic. What you may not know is that the presence of online predators has also increased as well as their chances of gaining access to our children.

Human trafficking is a $150 billion global industry that experts say is on the rise, especially online. In an interview with a local television station in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, prosecutors Melissa Hoppmeyer and Kathryn Marsh shared that children between the ages of 11 to 14 are being highly recruited by sex traffickers. They say these abusers are master manipulators that seek out both girls and boys they believe to be vulnerable. They are commonly connecting with unsuspecting youth through online gaming and in chatrooms.

Read More
Know! To Talk About The Attack On The Capitol
When one of the world’s most secure buildings recently came under siege, many young people witnessed the live images of protestors creating chaos and engaging in acts of violence. With the pandemic causing many families to be homebound, more young people were likely to have watched the assault taking place in real time. In addition to traditional TV media coverage, Instagram, Snapchat, TikTok and other social media outlets were quickly flooded with not only live images, but videos, memes, and individuals and groups sharing every viewpoint possible.

It was difficult for many of us adults to process, and likely even more so for our youth. In a recent survey, 63% of tweens and teens said watching the news makes them feel afraid, angry, sad and/or depressed. With all the disturbing and despicable acts that took place and were shown on the news that day and the days to follow, there was plenty to invoke fear and anger, in addition to worrying about what may happen next.

Read More
Know! To Put Self-Care and Connection into Practice in the New Year
We’ve happily kicked 2020 to the curb and welcomed in 2021 with open arms. Now it is time to figure out what we want to make of this fresh, new year. If we learned anything in 2020, it is the importance of self-care and connection for a healthy mind and body. We may still be wearing masks, social distancing, and dealing with other COVID-related regulations, however, the time to get motivated, set new goals, and create joy is now. Children of all ages can and should be encouraged to do the same.

When it comes to New Year resolutions, experts say that 60% of people abandon them within the first six months, while another 25% do so after just one week. With that in mind, instead of getting stuck on repeat, let’s focus on meaningful, achievable goals that promote well-being for ourselves and others.

Read More
Know! Compassion and Caring to Reduce COVID Stigma
COVID-19 continues to present new challenges, burdens, and consequences in our daily lives and that of young people. A sneeze or cough in a public setting may have once elicited a “bless you,” but nowadays it’s more likely to prompt heads turning with looks of disapproval. For people who have, or have had COVID, they may feel as if they contracted the plague, based on the way others treat them. They may experience feelings of isolation, depression, and abandonment. The stigma that surrounds this disease must end, not only for the physical health and mental wellbeing of those who have COVID, but in order to help bring an end to this pandemic in communities throughout our nation and world.

Read More
Know! To Steer Youth Clear of Psychedelics
Psilocybin, the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms, is in the spotlight in America. Studies are currently evaluating its potential for medical benefits—a measure that may provide a false sense of safety around its use, especially among teens. In the previous tip, “Know! What’s Up With Psilocybin,” we discussed the shift in attitude toward psychedelic drugs in the U.S., as voters in Oregon legalized psilocybin and voters in Colorado decriminalized its use. In turn, this can reduce young people’s perception of psilocybin’s harm.

Regardless of law or potential medical uses however, psilocybin is a powerful, dangerous hallucinogenic drug. Youth must be made clearly aware of these dangers and empowered to steer clear of this drug.

Read More
Know! What’s Up with Psychedelics?
While you may not be familiar with psilocybin, chances are you have heard of psychedelic mushrooms, or shrooms. Psilocybin is the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms. Though many of us associate psychedelics with the 60’s, there has been a resurgence of interest in their use. In November, Oregon became the first state to legalize psilocybin, and it has America talking. The question is, are you talking to your teens about this substance? If not, let us help you get the conversation started.

Here’s Some Info to Know! on Psilocybin
Psilocybin and other psychedelic drugs were broadly banned under the 1970 Controlled Substances Act.
It is classified as a Schedule I drug, meaning, it has no legally accepted medical use and has a high potential for abuse.
In May 2019, Denver, Colorado became the first city to decriminalize psilocybin, with Ann Arbor, Michigan; Oakland and Santa Cruz, California joining shortly after.
Washington D.C. passed a ballot initiative to decriminalize this substance earlier this month.  

Read More
Know! Gratitude for the Health of It
November is here to kick off the holiday season. Just like most things in 2020, Thanksgiving is bound to look different this year due to COVID-19. At a time when we might normally be gearing up to travel to grandma’s house or preparing to host extended family members for dinner, this time around we may be forced to break yet another tradition. But instead of dwelling on the negative, it is more important than ever that we count our blessings and focus on gratitude—for the health of it.

Experts say there is actual science behind being grateful, and that it is central to our physical and mental health. “Grateful people are healthier, happier, and more satisfied with their lives,” says Dr. Christine Carter, a Berkeley researcher whose work is focused on the science of happiness. “They are more resilient and have a higher sense of self-worth. Grateful teens are less likely to abuse alcohol and drugs and less likely to have behavior problems at school. The list goes on and on.”

Read More
KNOW! To Bust the Myths to Prevent Teen Prescription Drug Abuse
When it comes to talking to our children about the dangers of drugs, we tend to focus the conversation on illegal or “street” drugs. While those drugs are extremely dangerous and absolutely should be part of the conversation, we cannot forget to include the high risks involved with the misuse or abuse of prescription drugs. In fact, according to Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), prescription drug abuse is the fastest-growing drug problem in the U.S. and is profoundly impacting the lives of teens.

Parents can make a huge difference. In addition to following the three simple steps shared in the previous Know! Tip, KNOW!, SECURE, DISPOSE To Prevent Teen Prescription Drug Abuse, parents are encouraged to talk, and then talk some more with their children on this subject. Experts say children whose parents talk early and often about the dangers of drugs are up to 50 percent less likely to use drugs in the first place. Unfortunately, only 22 percent of teens report having specific conversations on the topic of prescription drug abuse with their parents. With that in mind, many parents can take a simple, but monumental step toward prevention by starting these important conversations.

Read More
Know, Secure, Dispose—To Prevent Teen Prescription Drug Abuse!
October 24th is National Prescription Drug Takeback Day; a day to rid our medicine cabinets of unused, unwanted, and expired over-the-counter and prescription drugs.

Here’s why:
The most common way young people get their hands on prescription medications for misuse is to simply reach into their home or a grandparent’s medicine cabinet.  
Prescription medicines are one of the top drugs of choice among high school students, following alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco.
Youth who misuse prescription drugs are also more likely to smoke cigarettes, engage in heavy drinking, and use illicit drugs, including marijuana and cocaine.

Prescription drugs are meant to help us, but they can harm our children, ourselves, and others when abused or misused.

Read More
Know! To Positively Connect with Your Teen
The desire to connect with others is universal, which is why social media has exploded over the years among people of all ages. When it comes to teens, just about everyone has at least one social media account to be able to connect with their “friends” at any given moment. A child’s virtual and in-person connections are important and highly influential in their lives, however, it cannot compare to the importance and influence of the parent-child connection—for better or worse. It’s the relationship between the parent or other caregiver and the child that serves as the backdrop of present and future interactions with others and highly impacts how young people make decisions. The parent-child relationship must be fostered and strengthened for healthy adolescent development.

Children whose relationships with their parents can be characterized as consistent, warm, kind, loving, and stable, are much more likely to: initiate positive social interactions with others, respond to situations with empathy, be cooperative with others, exhibit a higher self-esteem and make healthy life choices, including the decision not to use alcohol and other drugs.

Read More
Helpful Parent Links for Online Learning
Please click on the following links for online learning training.

Click the following for more information:  Remote Learning Parent letter .pdf

Read More
Know! To Beware of the Benadryl Challenge
There’s a dangerous new TikTok game that educators and parents should know about—the Benadryl Challenge. The idea is to take as many Benadryl tablets as necessary to hallucinate or “trip out,” while of course capturing it all on one’s cellphone to then share with others. A 15-year-old Oklahoma girl died last month attempting this challenge, and three more Texas teens ended up in the hospital.



Read More
Know! Six R’s for Less Stress Homeschooling
The pandemic wreaked havoc on many families’ summer plans, and now as school starts back in session, it appears the turbulence will continue. Some schools plan to take place in-person, some plan to go virtual, some are planning for a blended version. Regardless of how it starts off, most schools have been clear that all plans are subject to change depending on COVID-19 numbers—which gives way to more uncertainty.

Uncertainty means different things for different people, as we are each faced with unique family dynamics and circumstances. However, we are all in the same boat when it comes to the concern for how these changes will impact our children’s academic success, mental health, physical well-being, and futures.

Read More
Know! July is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that people who identify as a member of a minority are less likely to receive a diagnosis of and treatment for mental illness, have less access to mental health services, and often receive a poorer quality of mental health care. These factors negatively impact mental health outcomes, including the risk for suicide and depression.
Read More
Know! To Define Racial Terms for Teens
Conversations on race and racism are not necessarily easy or comfortable, but they are imperative. To have informed, constructive conversations with our children on this subject, we must first lay the foundation. We can do so by discussing some key terms with them, as shared in the previous Know! Tip. While some of the words and definitions may seem basic, it is important children (and adults) understand the differences between them. It is also necessary to catch up on some of the new, more complex terms being used, and share those with our young people as well. If you would like, take a moment now and review the previous tip, Know! To Define Racial Terms for Teens, which has a glossary of terms you’ll want to know.

The conversation certainly should not end with definitions. It is imperative to keep talking. If you’re at a loss for words, we can help. Here are some things to consider incorporating into your ongoing conversations on this topic with your children.

Read More
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Forms
Lunch Menu
One Call Now
Order My Transcript
Parent Grade Viewer
Start Talking
Student Enrollment
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DISTRICT NEWS

Know! To Create A Summer Bucket List

For many students, summer break has officially begun. That means a break from having to drag tired children out of bed and a break from all the homework. But most of all, it means a chance for our young people to enjoy a little more fun and relaxation. 

For a kid, summer seems to go on forever. As an adult, however, we know how quickly it can fly by. While spontaneity can be exciting and fun, a little preplanning can go a long way in helping our tweens and teens make the most of the summer months.

Research proves time and again that there is power in writing down your goals and refer to them often. So, gather your children, their ideas and get your must-do summer fun ideas on paper.
More +

Know! May Is Mental Health Awareness Month

In celebration of Mental Health Awareness Month, Mental Health America (MHA) is sharing practical tools that everyone can use to improve their mental health and increase their resiliency.

While one in five people will experience a mental illness during their lifetime, everyone faces challenges in life that can impact their mental health. In fact, among the people who took an anxiety screening at mhascreening.org in 2020, 64% felt afraid, as if something awful might happen at least half of the time or nearly every day. Another 50% of people who took MHA’s depression screening in 2020 reported feeling that they were a failure or had let their families down nearly every day.
More +

Know! How To Combat Spring Fever


Spring has sprung and the changes are plentiful; the trees are awakening, flowers are blooming, the sun is shining longer and warmer. You may notice changes in your children as well this time of year. They may have increased energy, impulsiveness and restlessness. Teachers may catch them daydreaming more in school and fidgeting during class. While doctors do not consider this an official medical or psychological condition, this real phenomenon has a name—it’s called SPRING FEVER.

There is an abundance of research on how seasonal changes impact children’s moods and behaviors. The problem with spring fever is, when restlessness and impulsiveness rise, trouble tends to follow. It is common for young people to experience attitude changes and display acting-out behaviors, and unfortunately, teachers seem to get the brunt of it. Additionally, schools see a drop in attendance this time of year, as well as their students’ ability to focus and stay on task.

So how can we help children finish out the school year strong, while keeping the attitudes and behaviors in check?
More +

Know! To Keep It Safe This Party Season

Prom and graduation seasons are quickly approaching. Though COVID-19 lingers on, many school districts around the country are working on plans to allow for both events to safely take place this year. While these celebrations will most likely look and feel different from prepandemic times, there are certain aspects that are likely to continue on—we’re talking about underage drinking.

As a parent, it may be tempting to think to ourselves that if our older teens are going to experiment with a substance, we’d prefer it to be alcohol over other drugs. However, when we consider the range of risks and negative consequences alcohol presents, we know we cannot afford to allow for underage drinking.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) shares the following dangers associated with teens consuming alcohol:
More +

Know! To Talk Teen Romance

It’s spring, and love is in the air, regardless of there being a pandemic taking place. In fact, while COVID may be creating additional complexities for romance, young love is still blooming. Though some parents cringe at the thought of talking to their child about romantic relationships, it’s a must-have discussion. As we think about the ongoing “talks” we will have with our sons and daughters, it’s important to know that we would be amiss if those conversations focused solely on sex education, abstinence, how to prevent pregnancy and how to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. While these are all necessary and vital topics, there is another monumental part of the teen romance talk that needs to be addressed, that is, what it means to have a healthy romantic relationship and how to recognize when it’s not.

According to LoveIsRespect.org, all relationships fall somewhere on The Relationship Spectrum from healthy to abusive, with unhealthy being somewhere in the middle.
Healthy relationships involve:

Respect.
Good communication.
Trust.
Honesty.
Equality.
More +

Know! Online Predators On The Rise

It is no surprise that young people are racking up more time on their electronic devices for both work and play due to the pandemic. What you may not know is that the presence of online predators has also increased as well as their chances of gaining access to our children.

Human trafficking is a $150 billion global industry that experts say is on the rise, especially online. In an interview with a local television station in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, prosecutors Melissa Hoppmeyer and Kathryn Marsh shared that children between the ages of 11 to 14 are being highly recruited by sex traffickers. They say these abusers are master manipulators that seek out both girls and boys they believe to be vulnerable. They are commonly connecting with unsuspecting youth through online gaming and in chatrooms.
More +

Know! To Talk About The Attack On The Capitol

When one of the world’s most secure buildings recently came under siege, many young people witnessed the live images of protestors creating chaos and engaging in acts of violence. With the pandemic causing many families to be homebound, more young people were likely to have watched the assault taking place in real time. In addition to traditional TV media coverage, Instagram, Snapchat, TikTok and other social media outlets were quickly flooded with not only live images, but videos, memes, and individuals and groups sharing every viewpoint possible.

It was difficult for many of us adults to process, and likely even more so for our youth. In a recent survey, 63% of tweens and teens said watching the news makes them feel afraid, angry, sad and/or depressed. With all the disturbing and despicable acts that took place and were shown on the news that day and the days to follow, there was plenty to invoke fear and anger, in addition to worrying about what may happen next.
More +

Know! To Put Self-Care and Connection into Practice in the New Year

We’ve happily kicked 2020 to the curb and welcomed in 2021 with open arms. Now it is time to figure out what we want to make of this fresh, new year. If we learned anything in 2020, it is the importance of self-care and connection for a healthy mind and body. We may still be wearing masks, social distancing, and dealing with other COVID-related regulations, however, the time to get motivated, set new goals, and create joy is now. Children of all ages can and should be encouraged to do the same.

When it comes to New Year resolutions, experts say that 60% of people abandon them within the first six months, while another 25% do so after just one week. With that in mind, instead of getting stuck on repeat, let’s focus on meaningful, achievable goals that promote well-being for ourselves and others.
More +

Know! Compassion and Caring to Reduce COVID Stigma

COVID-19 continues to present new challenges, burdens, and consequences in our daily lives and that of young people. A sneeze or cough in a public setting may have once elicited a “bless you,” but nowadays it’s more likely to prompt heads turning with looks of disapproval. For people who have, or have had COVID, they may feel as if they contracted the plague, based on the way others treat them. They may experience feelings of isolation, depression, and abandonment. The stigma that surrounds this disease must end, not only for the physical health and mental wellbeing of those who have COVID, but in order to help bring an end to this pandemic in communities throughout our nation and world.
More +

Know! To Steer Youth Clear of Psychedelics

Psilocybin, the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms, is in the spotlight in America. Studies are currently evaluating its potential for medical benefits—a measure that may provide a false sense of safety around its use, especially among teens. In the previous tip, “Know! What’s Up With Psilocybin,” we discussed the shift in attitude toward psychedelic drugs in the U.S., as voters in Oregon legalized psilocybin and voters in Colorado decriminalized its use. In turn, this can reduce young people’s perception of psilocybin’s harm.

Regardless of law or potential medical uses however, psilocybin is a powerful, dangerous hallucinogenic drug. Youth must be made clearly aware of these dangers and empowered to steer clear of this drug.
More +

Know! What’s Up with Psychedelics?

While you may not be familiar with psilocybin, chances are you have heard of psychedelic mushrooms, or shrooms. Psilocybin is the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms. Though many of us associate psychedelics with the 60’s, there has been a resurgence of interest in their use. In November, Oregon became the first state to legalize psilocybin, and it has America talking. The question is, are you talking to your teens about this substance? If not, let us help you get the conversation started.

Here’s Some Info to Know! on Psilocybin
Psilocybin and other psychedelic drugs were broadly banned under the 1970 Controlled Substances Act.
It is classified as a Schedule I drug, meaning, it has no legally accepted medical use and has a high potential for abuse.
In May 2019, Denver, Colorado became the first city to decriminalize psilocybin, with Ann Arbor, Michigan; Oakland and Santa Cruz, California joining shortly after.
Washington D.C. passed a ballot initiative to decriminalize this substance earlier this month.  
More +

Know! Gratitude for the Health of It

November is here to kick off the holiday season. Just like most things in 2020, Thanksgiving is bound to look different this year due to COVID-19. At a time when we might normally be gearing up to travel to grandma’s house or preparing to host extended family members for dinner, this time around we may be forced to break yet another tradition. But instead of dwelling on the negative, it is more important than ever that we count our blessings and focus on gratitude—for the health of it.

Experts say there is actual science behind being grateful, and that it is central to our physical and mental health. “Grateful people are healthier, happier, and more satisfied with their lives,” says Dr. Christine Carter, a Berkeley researcher whose work is focused on the science of happiness. “They are more resilient and have a higher sense of self-worth. Grateful teens are less likely to abuse alcohol and drugs and less likely to have behavior problems at school. The list goes on and on.”
More +

KNOW! To Bust the Myths to Prevent Teen Prescription Drug Abuse

When it comes to talking to our children about the dangers of drugs, we tend to focus the conversation on illegal or “street” drugs. While those drugs are extremely dangerous and absolutely should be part of the conversation, we cannot forget to include the high risks involved with the misuse or abuse of prescription drugs. In fact, according to Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), prescription drug abuse is the fastest-growing drug problem in the U.S. and is profoundly impacting the lives of teens.

Parents can make a huge difference. In addition to following the three simple steps shared in the previous Know! Tip, KNOW!, SECURE, DISPOSE To Prevent Teen Prescription Drug Abuse, parents are encouraged to talk, and then talk some more with their children on this subject. Experts say children whose parents talk early and often about the dangers of drugs are up to 50 percent less likely to use drugs in the first place. Unfortunately, only 22 percent of teens report having specific conversations on the topic of prescription drug abuse with their parents. With that in mind, many parents can take a simple, but monumental step toward prevention by starting these important conversations.
More +

Know, Secure, Dispose—To Prevent Teen Prescription Drug Abuse!

October 24th is National Prescription Drug Takeback Day; a day to rid our medicine cabinets of unused, unwanted, and expired over-the-counter and prescription drugs.

Here’s why:
The most common way young people get their hands on prescription medications for misuse is to simply reach into their home or a grandparent’s medicine cabinet.  
Prescription medicines are one of the top drugs of choice among high school students, following alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco.
Youth who misuse prescription drugs are also more likely to smoke cigarettes, engage in heavy drinking, and use illicit drugs, including marijuana and cocaine.

Prescription drugs are meant to help us, but they can harm our children, ourselves, and others when abused or misused.
More +

Know! To Positively Connect with Your Teen

The desire to connect with others is universal, which is why social media has exploded over the years among people of all ages. When it comes to teens, just about everyone has at least one social media account to be able to connect with their “friends” at any given moment. A child’s virtual and in-person connections are important and highly influential in their lives, however, it cannot compare to the importance and influence of the parent-child connection—for better or worse. It’s the relationship between the parent or other caregiver and the child that serves as the backdrop of present and future interactions with others and highly impacts how young people make decisions. The parent-child relationship must be fostered and strengthened for healthy adolescent development.

Children whose relationships with their parents can be characterized as consistent, warm, kind, loving, and stable, are much more likely to: initiate positive social interactions with others, respond to situations with empathy, be cooperative with others, exhibit a higher self-esteem and make healthy life choices, including the decision not to use alcohol and other drugs.
More +

Helpful Parent Links for Online Learning

Please click on the following links for online learning training.

Click the following for more information:  Remote Learning Parent letter .pdf
More +

Know! To Beware of the Benadryl Challenge

There’s a dangerous new TikTok game that educators and parents should know about—the Benadryl Challenge. The idea is to take as many Benadryl tablets as necessary to hallucinate or “trip out,” while of course capturing it all on one’s cellphone to then share with others. A 15-year-old Oklahoma girl died last month attempting this challenge, and three more Texas teens ended up in the hospital.


More +

Know! Six R’s for Less Stress Homeschooling

The pandemic wreaked havoc on many families’ summer plans, and now as school starts back in session, it appears the turbulence will continue. Some schools plan to take place in-person, some plan to go virtual, some are planning for a blended version. Regardless of how it starts off, most schools have been clear that all plans are subject to change depending on COVID-19 numbers—which gives way to more uncertainty.

Uncertainty means different things for different people, as we are each faced with unique family dynamics and circumstances. However, we are all in the same boat when it comes to the concern for how these changes will impact our children’s academic success, mental health, physical well-being, and futures.
More +

Know! July is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that people who identify as a member of a minority are less likely to receive a diagnosis of and treatment for mental illness, have less access to mental health services, and often receive a poorer quality of mental health care. These factors negatively impact mental health outcomes, including the risk for suicide and depression. More +

Know! To Define Racial Terms for Teens

Conversations on race and racism are not necessarily easy or comfortable, but they are imperative. To have informed, constructive conversations with our children on this subject, we must first lay the foundation. We can do so by discussing some key terms with them, as shared in the previous Know! Tip. While some of the words and definitions may seem basic, it is important children (and adults) understand the differences between them. It is also necessary to catch up on some of the new, more complex terms being used, and share those with our young people as well. If you would like, take a moment now and review the previous tip, Know! To Define Racial Terms for Teens, which has a glossary of terms you’ll want to know.

The conversation certainly should not end with definitions. It is imperative to keep talking. If you’re at a loss for words, we can help. Here are some things to consider incorporating into your ongoing conversations on this topic with your children.
More +
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Phone: 937-548-3185
Fax: 937-548-6943

Call 937-548-3185